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History

HISTORY  AT  HEBRON

Congratulations to the 2015 Year 11 History students who obtained a 75% Excellence Subject Endorsement level & those in Level 2 who secured a 100% Merit Subject Endorsement level.


"We must think HISTORICALLY. When Christians cannot identify the historical tides that shape and sweep their cultures, they cannot address the issues of the day" - Anon


HISTORY  LEVEL  ONE – YEAR  11
 
YEAR 11 HISTORY INTERNALS & EXTERNALS 2016
AS Title Type Credits Dates
History 1.1 AS91001
Carry out an investigation of an historical event, or place, of significance to New Zealanders
Internal 4 TBA*
History 1.2 AS91002
Demonstrate understanding of an historical event, or place, of significance to New Zealanders
Internal 4 TBA*
History 1.4 AS91004
Demonstrate understanding of different perspectives of people in an historical event of significance to New Zealanders
Internal 4 TBA
History 1.3
AS91003
Interpret sources of an historical event of significance to New Zealanders External 4 TBA
History 1.5
AS91005
Describe the causes and consequences of an historical event External 4 TBA
Notes:
1. * - takes into account examination preparation, the sitting of examinations & the return of
    examination papers during the third term.
2. Where dates are similar this involves two in one internals, two separate internals involving the same
    topic.

http://www.nzqa.govt.nz/ncea/assessment/search.do?query=history&view=achievements&level=01

NATURE OF LEVEL ONE  INTERNAL ASSESSMENTS
 
Standard 91001: Carry out an investigation of an historical event, or place, of
significance to New Zealanders
 
To carry out an investigation involves:
• identifying a topic
• identifying possible sources and how they may be useful
• selecting relevant historical evidence from a variety of sources in accordance with focussing questions
   that are provided in the task instructions
• organising this evidence appropriately
• recording the details of the sources of selected evidence.

See the page link to "Key Concepts in History".
 
Standard 91002: Demonstrate understanding of an historical event, or place, of
significance to New Zealanders
 
To demonstrate understanding involves:
• describing an historical event or place
• and communicating in own words findings that result from an investigation, using supporting
  evidence to show links between the event, the people concerned and its significance to New
  Zealanders.
 
Standard 91004: Demonstrate understanding of different perspectives of people in an historical event of significance to New Zealanders
 
To demonstrate understanding involves giving historically accurate accounts from the perspectives of different named people in an identified historical context, with relevant supporting evidence.
 
NATURE OF LEVEL ONE EXTERNAL ASSESSMENTS
 
Standard 91003: Interpret sources of an historical event of significance to New Zealanders
 
Format of the assessment: A variety of sources (from the Explanatory Notes to the achievement standard) will be used to assess historical skills.
Questions will require paragraph-length answers.
Candidates will be provided with a question-and-answer booklet and a resource booklet. Resources supplied: A variety of historical resources, primary and secondary, will be provided for students to interpret. Content/context details: The context for the historical sources is generic, and no previous content knowledge is expected.
 
Standard 91005: Describe the causes and consequences of an historical event
 
Format of the assessment: Candidates write one essay. There is one question that is of generic nature based on the Achievement Standard. Candidates will be required to reframe the question to include the specifics of their chosen event. Content/context details: There is no prescribed content
 
“Don't you wish you could go back and delete the World Wars, the natural disasters, the genocide, and the terror strikes from world history? Don't you wish you could bring back those leaders whose voice would inspire us even in the tumult and noise of today? Unfortunately, life does not give us a second chance but history often repeats itself. So read along and find the roots of the present in the past.”
Voltaire, 18th century French philosopher.
 
TOPICS  STUDIED  AT  LEVEL ONE
 
“We should not look back unless it is to derive useful lessons from past errors, and for the purpose of profiting by dearly bought experience.”
Marcus Tulius Cicero, 106-43 BC, writer, politician and great roman orator.
 
“History not used is nothing, for all intellectual life is action, like practical life, and if you don't use the stuff well, it might as well be dead”.
Arnold J. Toynbee, 1955, one of the greatest historical theorists.
 
1.  THE ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION OF SOURCE MATERIAL
 
Given the nature of this examination paper and the low grades students tend to achieve in it, many schools are no longer offering this option as an external. By in large there has been a tendency to teach the skills required en passant. The rational being, as no body of historical knowledge is required it does not need to be formally taught. At Hebron this year we decided to do otherwise. Historical resources are the fundamental building blocks to unlocking the past and more and more are becoming central to university history courses. It is unwise to ignore them.
 
Sources either, primary and secondary may include: people, libraries, museums, newspapers, artefacts, historical sites, videos, websites, graphs, cartoons, films, tape-recorded radio programmes, DVDs,
blogs, letters, diaries, government reports etc. Through close reading, careful comprehension students will be taught to extract meaning to enable the correct analysis and interpretation of source material
 
Historical skills nurtured are used to identify concepts such as: perspectives, reliability or bias, continuity and change, intent and motivation, as well as, cause and effect. Essentially this is a methodology course and case studies are used to train the students to be grass roots historians.
 
AS91003 is an external specifically dedicated to assess the interpretation of sources but all three internals, AS91001,  AS91002 and AS91004, are heavily dependent on the skilful use of source materials. Therefore, mastery of source interpretation is highly relevant and critical as regards 80% of the credits on offer.
 
Gk Phil song  
And now as they say time for something completely different. Click on the image above. Sit back and let some Ancient Greek Philosophers sock it to you.

"I swore never to be silent whenever and wherever human beings endure suffering and humiliation. We must always take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented."
Elie Wiesel, Holocaust survivor
 
"People always say that I didn't give up my seat because I was tired, but that isn't true. I was not tired physically, or no more tired than I usually was at the end of a working day. I was not old, although some people have an image of me as being old then. I was forty-two. No, the only tired I was, was tired of giving in."
Rosa Parks, civil rights activist, USA describing how she sparked the famous Montgomery Bus Boycott in1955.
 
2.  THE BLACK CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT IN THE USA, 1863 TO 1969

         B1                  B2a                  B3
         State troopers block the Little rock Nine from entering                 Elizabeth Eckford harrassed on her                The Screaming Eagles escort the Nine to school
         Central High School                                                               way to Central High School           

The end of the bitter American Civil War saw the passing of the 13th (abolished slavery) and the 14th (established equal rights for all citizens) Amendments brought hope to many Afro-Americans living in the white supremacist Southern States. Such hopes were quickly dashed with the formation of the KKK, emergence of the infamous Jim Crow laws and the Supreme Court decision in 1896 that legalised and institutionalised segregation.
 
Yet things were changing in the USA, especially in the more liberal Northern States were an educated Black middle class emerged and began to organise resistance to racial segregation in the South. What followed was a protracted battle to bring about change. The initial focus was on reversing segregation in the field of education and this culminated in the landmark Supreme Court ruling in the Brown vs Board of Education, Topeka case in 1954. Segregation was declared to be unconstitutional but the struggle had just begun. The consequences were dire and white resistance in many of the Southern States became intense and fierce.
 
The Brown case had set a precedent for change and civil rights organisations launched protests against all forms of segregation involving public facilities. The Black Civil Rights Movement witnessed the birth of the leadership of the Rev Martin Luther King, who lived up to the origins of his name, took a stand and led a non-violent campaign that was to indelibly leave its stamp on American society and on the world as a whole. Yet, resistance to desegregation and the integration of schools hit boiling point at Central High School, Little Rock, Arkansas in 1957, an event that saw the State Governor and the President shape up against one another. As the drama unfolded the President deployed the renowned Screaming Eagles, the battle-hardened 101st Airborne Division, immortalised in the TV series, “The Band of Brothers”, with fixed bayonets on the rifles, to escort nine black school children to classes at the formerly all white Central High School. It was an unprecedented step in USA history. It was not until  1969 that the issue of the desegregation of schools in the USA was finally resolved.   
 
This topic is geared towards the causes and consequences external essay paper AS 91005 and the internal AS91004.
 
A few civil rights websites look at:
 
http://civilliberty.about.com/od/raceequalopportunity/ig/History-of-Black-Civil-Rights/
http://www.thekingcenter.org/
http://www.encyclopediaofarkansas.net/encyclopedia/entry-detail.aspx?entryID=4915
 
 Rosa Parks song
 Click on the image to hear the Rosa Parks Equality Song

"To all those who have suffered as a consequence of our troubled past I extend my sincere thoughts and deep sympathy. With the benefit of historical hindsight we can all see things which we would wish had been done differently or not at all."
Queen Elizabeth II
 
“History is a tool used by politicians to justify their intentions.”
George Bernard Shaw, British author.
 
3. THE SPRINGBOK RUGBY TOUR TO NEW ZEALAND , 1981
 
           S3                     S1                      S2
           Protest march along Bond St                                                                               The flour bombing of Eden Park                        Police and protestors in one of many bitter clashes

Rugby saw the emergence of two sporting giants in the world arena: South Africa and New Zealand. The rivalry between the two countries remains legendary but never before was the issue of sport and politics going to come to so deeply divided New Zealand society as it did in 1981.
 
The potential for division and dissent over the racial selection of team, already evident from the very beginning, became a reality with the entrenchment of apartheid in South Africa from 1948 onwards. Our compliance with South African requests to play only all white All Black teams led in the 60’s to growing opposition to such policies in New Zealand and saw the newly independent African states become increasingly critical of what they regarded as New Zealand’s tacit support of apartheid. This was to result in 33 nations boycotting the 1976 Montreal Olympics in protest against New Zealand’s participation.
 
Locally matters reached fever pitch when the government of the day, choose to subtly re-interpret it’s commitment under the Gleneagles Agreement, and refused to stop the Springbok tour to this country in 1981. What followed has become deeply embedded in our psyche as a nation. “Minto bars”, the pitch invasion at Hamilton, the Battle of Molesworth St, the flour bombing of the test at Eden Park, barricades, barbed wire, riot squads, bloodied protestors – scenes never before witnessed in New Zealand. Friendships disintegrated, marriages fell apart and even churches became deeply divided as people took pro or anti tour stands. For one crazy moment the heart of the country was torn asunder. The consequences that followed were profound and have served to shape our identity as a nation.
 
This course is geared towards the two internals AS91001 and AS 91002, as well as, serves as an option for the external causes and consequences essay paper AS91005.
 
A couple of Tour websites to dip into:
 
http://www.listener.co.nz/commentary/inside-the-1981-springbok-tour/
http://www.matapihi.org.nz/en/items?utf8=%E2%9C%93&text=springbok+tour+archive&commit=Search
http://www.greenandgoldrugby.com/community/threads/1981-springbok-tour-to-nz-30-years-old.9487/
 
“We learn from history that we learn nothing from history.”
Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, 19th century German philosopher
 
“History is ... a dialogue between the present and the past.”
Edward Hallet Carr, 20th century British historian. 
 


HISTORY  LEVEL  TWO – YEAR  12
 
YEAR 12 HISTORY EXTERNALS & INTERNALS 2016
AS Title Type Credits Dates
History 2,1
AS91229
Carry out an inquiry of an historical event or place that is of significance to New Zealanders Internal 4 TBA*
History 2.2
AS91230
Examine an historical event, or place, of significance to New Zealanders Internal 5 TBA*
History 2.4
AS91232
Interpret different perspectives of people in an historical event that is of significance to New Zealanders Internal 5 TBA
History 2.3
AS91231
Examine sources of an historical event that is of significance to New Zealanders External 4 TBA
History 2.5
AS91233
Examine causes and consequences of a significant historical event External 5 TBA
Notes:
1. * - takes into account examination preparation, the sitting of examinations & the return of
    examination papers during the third term.
2. Where dates are similar this involves two in one internals, two separate internals involving the same
    topic.
http://www.nzqa.govt.nz/ncea/assessment/search.do?query=history&view=achievements&level=02
 
NATURE OF LEVEL TWO INTERNAL ASSESSMENTS
 
Standard 91229: Carry out an inquiry of an historical event or place that is of significance to New Zealanders
 
To carry out an inquiry involves:
• preparing to carry out an inquiry
• making annotations on the evidence
• organising sources and evidence
• evaluating the inquiry
 
AS91230: Examine an historical event or place that is of significance to New
Zealanders
 
To examine involves communicating key historical ideas through a coherent explanation of an event or place, with supporting evidence, and describing its significance to New Zealanders. Narrative by itself is insufficient, e.g. a chronological description of what happened in an historical event is not by itself an examination.
 
AS91232: Interpret different perspectives of people in an historical event that is
of significance to New Zealanders
 
To interpret different perspectives involves investigating and explaining perspectives in
an historically accurate manner either from the perspective of named people or
people in an identified historical context, or from the point of view of historians, with
supporting evidence.
 
NATURE OF LEVEL TWO EXTERNAL ASSESSMENTS
 
Standard 91231: Examine sources of an historical event that is of significance to New Zealanders
 
Format of the assessment: A variety of sources, as listed in the Explanatory Notes to the achievement standard, will be used to assess historical skills. Questions will require paragraph-length answers. Resources or information supplied: A variety of primary and secondary historical sources will be provided for candidates to interpret content/context details: The context for the historical sources is generic, and no previous content knowledge is expected.
 
Standard 91233: Examine causes and consequences of a significant historical event
 
Format of the assessment: One general essay topic will be provided. Using an historical context drawn from a list of topics, or from those they have studied during the year, candidates will be required to describe and explain the causes and consequences of a significant historical event. The answer is to be written in conventional essay format.
 
TOPICS  STUDIED  AT  LEVEL TWO
 
God cannot alter the past, but historians can.”
Thomas Carlyle, 19th century British historian and essayist.
 
“A generation, which ignores history, has no past – and no future.”
Robert Heinlein, USA, 20th century science fiction author.
 
1. THE EXAMINATION OF HISTORICAL SOURCES IN CONTEXT
 
As with Level One this is treated as a stand alone course building more comprehensively on the skills they have already developed. Here students will be exposed in depth to historical methodology and terminology in order to be able to develop high order conclusions, raise relevant questions as regards the source material and to show perceptive understanding of it.
 
Here students will need to become intensely engaged with historical sources as they develop an awareness of different perspectives evident, assess usefulness and reliability; and observe trends like motivation, change and continuity, as well as, cause and effect.  A case study will be undertaken and students will be trained to effectively deal with the format of the external examination. This will involve selecting and carefully explaining the significance of evidence; with an awareness of the limitations or value of the evidence being reviewed.
 
This course prepares the students for the external examination paper AS91231 but is, also, relevant again to the successful completion of the three internals AS91229,  AS91230 and AS91232.
 
   Martin Luther
"Martin Luther" by History for Music Lovers (click on the image above)
 
“History is written by the victors.”
Winston Churchill, great Second World War leader & British Prime Minister.
 
“History is the present. That's why every generation writes it anew. But what most people think of as history is its end product, myth.”
Edgar Lawrence "E. L." Doctorow, well known USA contemporary historical fiction author.
 
2. THE RUSSIAN REVOLUTION OF 1905
 
               R1                                   R3                                     R2
           The blinkered Tsar Nicholas II                                             The massacre of peaceful protestors on Bloody Sunday                                        Anti-Tsarist propaganda poster

The Romanov dynasty had lasted 300 years but Nicholas II, who ascended the throne in 1894, turned out to be the last tsar of Russia. How did such an ancient monarchy survive the traumatic events of 1905 only to collapse so spectacularly in 1917?
 
Nicholas II, deeply committed to the principle of the Divine Right of Kings, was incapable of rising to the challenges Russia was to face with the birth of the 20th century. Simply put the Romanov dynasty was out of date. Nicholas II was an autocrat. He ruled alone and unquestioned, but he had a weak personality, and his power was increasingly based on the military might of the army and on the Okhrana (the secret police). These were two-edged swords - they kept him in power, but they made him increasingly unpopular. The size, backwardness and ethnic diversity of the Russian Empire made it difficult to rule anyway.

Industrialisation,  urbanisation and poor labour conditions resulted in a growing discontented working class open to new ideas like Marxism. In the rural areas the debt-ridden peasants wanted more land, while the middle class were clamouring for democratic liberties. With the bulk of his army away fighting the Japanese in the Far East Nicholas was vulnerable at home when the massacre of peaceful protestors, a notorious event known as Bloody Sunday, was the spark that caused Russia to spectacularly explode into revolution. Yet, the Revolution itself was short lived, the revolutionaries lacked an united front, were deeply divided pursuing their own separate agendas, and able Tsarist ministers using the dual means of reform and repression, enable the Tsar to survive when he should have fallen. Though it did not succeed, Lenin called the 1905 Revolution “The Great Dress Rehearsal” for the events that followed.
 
This topic is geared towards the causes and consequences external essay paper AS91233 and the internal AS91232.
 
Some of the many websites on the topic:
 
http://modernhistoryteacher.wikispaces.com/Political,+Economic+and+Social+Grievances+in+20th+Century+Russia
http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/RUS1905.htm
http://www.timetoast.com/timelines/russia-in-the-20th-century

  
“A small body of determined spirits fired by an unquenchable faith in their mission can alter the course of history.”
Mahatma Gandhi, 20th century non-violent campaigner for Indian independence.
 
 “History is a narration of the events which have happened among mankind, including an account of the rise and fall of nations, as well as of other great changes which have affected the political and social condition of the human race.”
John J. Anderson, 1876, USA leading educator.
 
 French Revolution
If you need a refresher course on the causes of the French Revolution then click on the image above.
 
 3. PARIHAKA; PASSIVE RESISTENCE IN NEW ZEALAND
 
      P1                 P2                 P3
        Women  and children at Parihaka                                                               The Parihaka settlement captured by an artist                      The land clearance about to begin

Under the terms of the Treaty of Waitangi, the Crown assumed the monopoly of the purchase of Māori land. Yet, many Māori felt aggrieved over the fact that they did not receive a full and fair price from their land sales. A Native Land Court was established in 1865, but ceased buying Māori land. Instead, those Māori wishing to sell had to appear before the Native Land Court and prove their title to the land. On receiving a Crown title, they could then sell their land freely to whom they pleased.

However, very often on receiving land titles the Māori found they could lease their land but not sell it. Here the different cultural views over land ownership and utilisation came to the fore.. For the Māori, land was their country and a part of their tribal territory and heritage, not simply a source of food, profit, raised living standards, as land was seen by the Europeans.
  
In 1881 Parihaka was one of the largest Māori settlements in Taranaki. Approximately 1300 people lived in there. On the death of the prophet Te Ua Haumene in 1866, founder of the Pai Maarire ("Good and Peaceful") religion, his relatives Te Whiti and Tohu continued with Te Ua Haumene's teachings. As with Te Ua Haumene, Te Whiti and Tohu's teachings were mainly drawn from the Old Testament, and peace remained at the core of their teachings. Te Whiti and Tohu were considered by nearly all the Taranaki Māori as symbols of Māori resistance to colonisation. They saw their land rights as quite simply not negotiable with the Europeans. Land was sacred, and Te Whiti and Tohu stated that land which had been confiscated by the Europeans would be returned to the Māori. Nevertheless, peace was the continual and regular basis of their teachings. The Parihaka people were told not to retaliate against the Europeans, so that an eventual war would be avoided.
 
At this time, the whole of the coastal land area of Taranaki had been confiscated by the government. Plans were afoot to expand settler land interests. Te Whiti or Tohu, both prophets were willing to negotiate, but only with the Governor himself. Protracted diplomatic negotiations took place between the 1870's and the 1880's. When the Grey government started to survey the area in 1878 confrontation resulted. During what became known as “the year of the plough” the Parihaka Maori embarked on a campaign of passive resistance. Although the settlers feared war, the Parihakas remained unarmed. Ultimately, following stormy periods of unrest and the imprisonment of Parihaka activists, wary of the growing level of Maori support for Parihaka, the government moved to break up the community by force. But the story did not end there and further injustices were inflected on the leaders of the passive resistance movement. Eventually Parihaka was rebuilt and remained a centre for non-violent resistance to settler laws.
 
This topic is geared towards the two internals AS91229 and AS 91230, as well as, serves as an option for the external causes and consequences essay paper AS91233.
 
Parihaka on the web:
 
http://parihaka.com/
http://www.catholicworker.org.nz/cg/CG10-Parihaka.htm
http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/people/erueti-te-whiti-o-rongomai-iii




HISTORY  LEVEL  THREE – YEAR  13

Introduction
 
This course follows the requirements for NCEA Level 3 and the New Zealand History Syllabus and prepares students for both the internal and external assessments. This is a full-year course, consisting of 6 x 45 minute periods per week.
 
Preface
 
History offers an understanding of human activities in the past in the context of change through time.  The content of this course sets out to give students an understanding of some of the major forces and events that have shaped our world today.  It deals mainly with Maori and European Relationships in New Zealand during the 19th century and enables students to understand their heritage and that of their community, society and nation. It also offers students the opportunity to examine their own attitudes, to clarify their values, and explore historical ideas and concepts from a Christian perspective.
 
New Zealand Curriculum Achievement Objectives
http://nzcurriculum.tki.org.nz/The-New-Zealand-Curriculum/Social-sciences/Achievement-objectives
 
Social studies
 
  • Understand how policy changes are influenced by and impact on the rights, roles, and responsibilities of individuals and communities.
  • Understand how ideologies shape society and that individuals and groups respond differently to these beliefs.
 
History
 
  • Understand that the causes, consequences, and explanations of historical events that are of significance to New Zealanders are complex and how and why they are contested.
  • Understand how trends over time reflect social, economic, and political forces.
 
Aims
 
The aims of this course follow the aims of the History curriculum and the College:
 
•           to develop in students the ability to enter imaginatively into the events of the past
•           to develop skills of historical enquiry:  to define a problem and to gather, process and present
             information
•           to develop in students the ability to think critically about issues
•           to further students’ historical understanding of major forces shaping the modern world
•           to develop in students a deeper understanding of themselves as New Zealanders – their
             heritage, cultures, and shared values, and place in the world.
•           to foster among students an understanding of other peoples, distant in time and place.
•           to provide students with an understanding of history from a Christian perspective
•           to prepare students for Level 3 History Achievement Standards
•           develop skills that will assist in further education and that will be useful in life beyond school
 
Learning outcomes
 
To achieve these aims, students will, within the contexts of 19th Century New Zealand History:
 
•           plan and carry out independent historical research
•           communicate and present historical ideas clearly to show understanding of historical context
•           be able to examine and objectively analyse significant decisions made by people in history in an
             essay
•           analyse and evaluate evidence in historical sources
•           become familiar with historical terms and ideas
•           deepen their critical understanding of issues important to our nation
•           increase their knowledge of human behaviour, and their understanding of different lifestyles,
             cultures and viewpoints
•           observe how individuals and forces can influence the course of events which impact differentially
             upon the experience of peoples and nations
•           develop a personal framework for making informed decisions while being aware of Biblical
             principles, and increase their understanding of the modern world from a Christian perspective
 
Skill Objectives
 
The following skills are directed toward implementing the aims and learning outcomes.
 
1.        Information Gathering
            To be able to gather information by developing the abilities appropriate to Year 13 students to:
 
•           define a problem
•           select information from a variety of sources
•           record information in an organised form
 
2.         Information Processing
            To be able to process information gathered by developing the abilities appropriate to Year 13 students, to:
 
•           sift and classify information choosing what is important to a particular argument
•           weigh evidence:  to distinguish fact from opinion and the significant from the trivial: to recognise bias,
             propaganda and the limitations of a single piece of evidence
•           recognise specific points of view and be aware of differing historical interpretations
•           establish historical relationships:  between cause and effect, past and present, specific and general
•           form judgments and make generalisations on the basis of supporting evidence and sound argument
 
3.         Presentation
To be able to present findings in written, visual and/or oral form by developing the abilities, appropriate to
Year 13 students to:
 
•           present an argument and to support it with well-chosen evidence and reasoned conclusions
•           present material which is accurate, logical, concise and clear
•           apply, where appropriate, the recognised standards of historical presentation, e.g.  acknowledgement of
             sources, bibliography and footnotes
 
History Department Values.
 
In the History Department, students will be encouraged to value:
 
  • excellence, by aiming high and by persevering in the face of difficulties
  • innovation, inquiry, and curiosity, by thinking critically, creatively, and reflectively
  • diversity, as found in our different cultures, languages, and heritages
  • equity, through fairness and social justice
  • community and participation for the common good
  • ecological sustainability, which includes care for the environment
  • integrity, which involves being honest, responsible, and accountable and acting ethically and to respect themselves, others, and human rights.
 
Through their learning experiences, students will learn about:
 
  • their own values and those of others
  • different kinds of values, such as moral, social, cultural, aesthetic, and economic values
  • the values on which New Zealand’s cultural and institutional traditions are based
  • the values of other groups and cultures.
 
 
Through their learning experiences, students will develop their ability to:
 
  • express their own values
  • explore, with empathy, the values of others
  • critically analyse values and actions based on them
  • discuss disagreements that arise from differences in values and negotiate solutions
  • make ethical decisions and act on them.
 
Topics to be studied
 
At Level 3 History a move is made away from pedagogy to andragogy. Here the student is encouraged to become a self-directed & self-motivated learner. Pedagogy uses a style of teaching mainly teacher centered & focuses on “filling pupils heads” while they move towards academic maturity. Andragogy generally refers to the art and science of teaching adults. It is more focused on what the pupil learns versus what they are being taught. Andragogy assumes that pupils already have a significant amount of knowledge, are capable of making 'educated' choices in their learning experiences and learn best when 'the teacher' or facilitator uses a combination of teaching styles, some of which may be 'pedagogical' in nature. (See appendix 1: ANDRAGOGY AND PEDAGOGY)
 
In discussion at Level 2 in 2015 the following areas of study were chosen by the students for consideration: the French Revolution of 1789, the Execution of Mary Queen of Scots & an aspect of Early New Zealand History in the 19th Century. Students have chosen to focus on an in-depth study of the spread of Christianity to New Zealand, on the relationships between the Maori & the missionaries and the significance of the extension of Christianity to New Zealand. In addition, a major of component of the history course will be dedicated to the development of source interpretation and annotation skills that are both critical requirements for the successful completion of the internal & external assessment standards to be undertaken.
 
Regular homework exercises, class work and tests will be used to as opportunities to master the required skills for all Achievement Standards.  Students are to make every effort to complete these exercises so as to ensure the best results on the achievement standards. Task completion:  Care must be taken to ensure all parts of each assessment task are fully completed and submitted.  Failure to submit even one requirement could invalidate an assignment. Stationery requirements for this course of study are issued before the start of term
 
Resources
 
Topic specific text books:
  • A Century of Change, M Stenson and E Olssen, Longman
  • Longman Write-on notes, 19th Century New Zealand, S Dalton and S Watters
  • Te mana o Te Tiriti, R Naumann et al, New House
  • The Tauiwi, R Naumann, New House.
  • Level 3 History NZ Study Guide, Langton et al, ESA
 
Additional resources to consider:
  • Specialist texts
  • Visual and audio-visual material
  • Identified subject specific Internet sites
  • Internet
  • Interviews
  • History Department & School Library
 
Standards and credits
 
This Year 13 history course contributes 20 credits towards your Level 3 National Certificate of Educational Achievement. The credits are spread over 4 achievement standards, 2 of which are assessed externally in the examination, and 2 of which are internally assessed.
Standard Title Internal or  
External
Credits Literacy
AS91434 3.1 Research an historical event or place of significance to New Zealanders, using primary and secondary sources.
 

Internal
 
5
 
YES
AS91435 3.2 Analyse an historical event, or place, of significance to New Zealanders.
 
 
Internal
 
5
 
YES
AS91436 3.3 Analyse evidence relating to an historical event of significance to New Zealanders.
 
 
External
 
4
 
YES
AS91438 3.5 Analyse the causes and consequences of a significant historical event.
 
 
External
 
6
 
YES
 
 
INTERNAL ASSESSMENTS
 
3.1 (AS91434) – This Achievement Standard requires students to:
 
“Understand that the causes, consequences and explanations of historical events that are of significance to New Zealanders are complex and how and why they are contested.”
 
“Understand how trends over time reflect social, economic and political forces.”
 
This assessment also requires students to research using primary and secondary sources.  This means following a research process, making annotations that identify the relevance and assess the reliability of the selected evidence.  You will also need to evaluate the research process and identify the strength(s) and weakness(es) of the research process.
 
3.2 (AS91435) – This Achievement Standard requires students to:
 
“Understand that the causes and consequences and explanations of historical events that are of significance to New Zealanders are complex and how and why they are contested.”
 
“Understand how trends over time reflect social, economic and political forces.”
 
To analyse involves using historical evidence to identify key historical ideas and establishing the significance of the historical event or place to New Zealanders.  Narrative by itself is not sufficient, i.e. a chronological description of what happened in an historical event is not by itself an analysis.
 
Significance may be determined by:
  • The importance of the event to people alive at the time
  • How deeply people’s lives were affected at the time
  • How many lives were affected
  • The length of time people’s lives were affected
  • The extent to which the event continues to affect society
 
 
An event of significance to New Zealanders is understood to be:
  • A past event occurring in New Zealand
  • An international event involving New Zealanders
  • An international event influencing New Zealanders
 
To be of significance to New Zealanders, an event does not have to be located in New Zealand.
 
Level 3 NCEA requires 80 credits, which may include up to 20 credits from any level above or one level below. A certificate can be endorsed with Merit or Excellence provided 50 or more credits at that level are gained at Merit (or above) or Excellence.
 
University Entrance
 
From 2016 UE requirements are:
  • NCEA L3 Certificate  (60 credits) - INCLUDING
  • 14 credits in each of 3 approved subjects at L3+
  • 10 numeracy credits at L1+
  • 5 credits in writing and 5 credits in reading at L2+
 
Literacy requirements for University Entrance
 
Students require 10 credits from the standards assessed (5 credits in reading and 5 credits in writing) to meet the University Entrance literacy requirements. In History Level 3 the following assessment standards meet the literacy requirements: History 3.1 & History 3.2 in Reading & History 3.3 & History 3.5 in Reading & Writing.
 

   Star About Hebron

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ERO

The latest Education Review Office Report (2013) on Hebron Christian College has been publicised on the Government ERO website.

Read the review and see how well the school is performing. Click here
 

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